Character is action – Using what your brand does to define what your brand is

There is a truism that is often quoted in screenwriting: “character is action, not dialogue”.

For example, if you want to reveal that a junkie is addicted to drugs you don’t have him say “I’m so desperate for drugs I’ll do anything”, you put the drugs at the bottom of a blocked toilet, have him fish them out and swallow them.

Untitled

You know you’re a junkie if…

Character is action is also true in real life. When an on-hold message says “your call is important to us” but you’re still on hold 20 minutes later, that not only shows your call isn’t important, it also shows the people on the other end of the line are either happy to lie to you or delude themselves into thinking that no one will care about their lack of service.

This is why one of the first things any organisation should do when they’re thinking about brand development is audit how they act internally and externally, and how those actions appear to the people who see them. These actions do more to define how the organisation is perceived and what a brand currently stands for than any strategic business plan with overarching values and goals.

At Shabbadu, we like to start every brand development project with a Communications Audit and a set of workshops with our client’s front line staff. It allows us to capture and define every significant action taken on behalf of a brand. Are they positive or negative? Desperate or confident? Caring or selfish?

By capturing a snapshot of what an organisation does and how it does it, we give our clients a strong understanding of what their brand really stands for and what they might need to do differently to live up to the promise of their brand. It also gives us a great foundation to develop brand assets that make sense of the way their organisation acts.

This means you should end up with a brand that strengthens what it stands for in a natural, self-sustaining way, no matter what twists and turns the script takes.

Emojis: Linguistic evolution? Or stupid, bastardised Internet glitter?

Every generation bastardizes the language. It’s happened since forever. So really it should come as no surprise that the emerging rebellious youth, armed to the teeth with unlimited data caps and early-onset thumb arthritis, are helping to steer the vernacular into wondrously new, if head-scratchingly confounding, places with ‘emojis’ (winking smiley face).

meaning-of-emojis-11

The ‘Call an ambulance I’m having a stroke’ emoji.

The evolution of language is a natural, beautiful thing. It helps shape a generation’s identity and date stamps the zeitgeist, and hopefully, as a result, we progress as a society. Cultivating new ways to communicate helps us form bonds with our peers and gives the ‘cool kids’ a sort of shorthand to help them decipher who’s in and who’s out. But above all, it’s supposed to make communication easier.

Yet, I can’t see ‘emojis’ helping ‘us’ achieve any of these things.

woman emoji

I don’t know either TBH.

They distract, confuse, obfuscate, but most mischievously of all, potentially purport to dumb us down. Try finding the ‘emoji’ equivalent of distract, confuse and obfuscate, for instance. “Um, ok, well I’ve got a woman shrugging her shoulders…will that do?” No.

‘Emojis’ are the linguistic equivalent of glitter: nice in theory and can clearly serve a purpose, but once unleashed now inhabits every crevice of our existence and is seemingly impossible to get rid of. I can’t seem to shake this nagging feeling that they’re some big, dumb ‘so bad it’s good’ joke that people began using ironically. Only it’s been going on for so long now that everyone seems to have forgotten the punch line, walked the chicken back across the road and are now happily drinking in a bar with a horse, a tiny man with a piano, and various men of cloth.

maxresdefaultDon’t get me wrong; ‘emojis’ have their place as hieroglyphic hashtags to be used after the main event to highlight your point (ok signing hand) or provide a witty rejoinder (poo with eyes (hilarious)). However, plonk them in the middle of a sentence in place of an actual word and leave the reader to decipher your message at your own peril.

So are ‘emojis’ here to stay, or will they be banished to the cultural wilderness like Hammer Pants, tamagotchis and wine cooler?

I guess only (clock face) will (person whispering into their hand).